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Articles Tagged with donations

By Leah Morrison

Leah Morrison

 Leah Morrison

English, Lucas, Priest & Owsley, LLP

2018 Kentucky legislation expanded the types of services subject to sales and use tax, established economic nexus thresholds for remote retailers, and amended certain excise taxes. In other words, 2018 brought new headaches to Kentucky businesses statewide. But one group in particular was more burdened than the rest: nonprofit organizations. New legislation forced nonprofits to pay sales tax on all the extended services, if applicable, plus, most notably, on sales of admission. This cut deeply into a nonprofit’s ability to raise funds at fundraising events.

Nonprofits had to employ some creative techniques to separate sponsorships and donations from the costs associated with being allowed entry into their fundraising events. Additionally, sales tax had to be collected and paid on certain items auctioned during these events. If the auction item in question was a physical object, tax had to be paid on it – and at the auctioned price, not the actual, retail value of the item. But auction items such as lawn care services or vacations were exempt from sales tax collection. These are only a few examples of the nightmare nonprofits were forced to navigate. Compliance with sale tax laws drained their resources and significantly impacted the ability of nonprofits statewide to provide their charitable purposes in draining the resources they had available to them.

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By Nathan Vinson, Attorney
English, Lucas, Priest and Owsley, LLP

This is that time of year when we all start thinking about taxes – and how to pay less. We’ve often gotten the news from our accountants that perhaps our refunds won’t be as large as we’d like or that we owe. Ugh to both.

This is a good time to consider if your business can be more charitably minded, and perhaps help you pare back the tax burden next year.

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By Nathan Vinson, Attorney

English, Lucas, Priest and Owsley, LLP

IRA gift provisionOver the past decade, Congress has passed a law – usually at the last minute – that allows for gifts directly from Individual Retirement Accounts to charitable organizations with favorable tax treatment. The gifts can be up to $100,000 to qualifying organizations, but it has to be made directly to the charity. The IRA gift provision has been a popular way for some to give to their favorite organizations, for two key reasons:

  • The gift counts towards your required minimum distribution from your IRA for the year. As you may know, seniors ages 70.5 and up are required to take a minimum distribution from their IRA each year.
  • The gift is excluded from taxable income. The money won’t be included in your taxable income (as it would otherwise) if the money is paid directly to the qualifying charity.

Only those who are 70.5 or older can take advantage of it.

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By Nathan Vinson, Attorney
English, Lucas, Priest and Owsley, LLP

oopsIn fundraising and higher education circles, the imminent closure of Sweet Briar College in rural Central Virginia has been much-discussed. This small, women-only college has existed for nearly a century and has educated generations of women. But enrollment has declined and school’s board of trustees announced that this year’s graduating class in May will be its last.

One alumnae, Teresa Tomlinson, the mayor of Columbus, Georgia, noted that she had told college officials she was going to leave $1 million to Sweet Briar in her estate, and they greeted her news graciously and pleasantly, full of thank you’s and personal notes — and then announced two weeks later the school was closing. The mayor said she was baffled why school officials didn’t disclose this to her when she told them about the gift.

Even if the school changes course again and decides to remain open, those who were going to leave money to the college are probably going to be reluctant to do so again. But what would happen if Sweet Briar College was to receive a gift but then the college closed and the will could not be changed?

This happens from time to time with colleges, non-profits and other organizations that are likely to receive bequests from alumni and supporters. The foundation you wanted to support could have merged, changed its goals, re-branded as something else entirely or simply shut its doors. Then what?

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