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Articles Tagged with attorney

Nathan Vinson

Nathan Vinson

By Nathan Vinson

Right at two years to the date, Kentucky has again changed its power of attorney law by adopting parts of the Uniform Power of Attorney Act that it did not adopt as part of the changes that went into effect on July 14, 2018.  The new law went into effect on July 15, 2020, and applies to a power of attorney created before, on, or after July 15.  However, acts done before July 15, 2020 are not affected by the new law.

The biggest change created by the 2018 law was the requirement that the power of attorney be witnessed by two disinterested persons, though a power of attorney validly executed before that law went into effect remained valid.  The new law brings about three major changes – one of them being no more witnesses required!  Just two years after that requirement came into effect, it is again changed to take us back to prior law.  However, practitioners may decide it is best practice to continue to require two witnesses.  Further, some states require that the power of attorney have two witnesses, especially when used to transfer real estate.  On the flipside, the new law makes executing a power of attorney in urgent situations much easier.

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Leah Morrison

By: Leah Morrison

Number One: Medicaid is not Medicare.

Medicare is a federal health insurance program for people 65 years of age and older and for people under 65 who are totally and permanently disabled. Medicare is not means tested.  Medicare provides limited coverage for nursing home stays- only up to 100 days, after meeting eligibility requirements.

Medicaid is also a federal program that provides insurance coverage, as well as in-home, assisted living, and nursing home benefits.  Medicaid is a means tested program, meaning the applicant must have income and resources below a certain threshold.  Medicaid eligibility depends on meeting both financial and non-financial requirements.

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By Brett Reynolds, Partner

Brett Reynolds

Brett Reynolds

In April 2018, The Trump Administration  signed an Executive Order entitled, “Buy American, Hire American”. The policy directs the Department of Homeland Security to issue H-1B visas to only the most-skilled foreigners or highest-paid beneficiaries.  While this is a laudable purpose, according to new data acquired by the National Foundation for American Policy (NFAP), the USCIS has begun to increase H-1B visa denials and the number of Requests for Evidence (RFEs) issued to H-1B visa. As a result, employers have reported that the time lost due to the increase in denials and Requests for Evidence has cost millions of dollars in fees and delays, while often aiding competitors that operate exclusively outside the United States.  Since the Trump Administration has taken office, the RFEs for H-1Bs have skyrocketed:

Sarah-Jarboe-Portrait-2016

Sarah Jarboe

On August 21, 2019, a new rule from the Environmental Protection Agency went into effect in Kentucky that could change the way certain healthcare facilities are required to manage pharmaceutical hazardous waste.  The rule is intended to streamline the collection and handling requirements of pharmaceutical hazardous waste and reduce the complexity of hazardous waste regulations that must be followed by healthcare facilities.

What are some of the new requirements?

By Leah Morrison

Leah Morrison

 Leah Morrison

English, Lucas, Priest & Owsley, LLP

2018 Kentucky legislation expanded the types of services subject to sales and use tax, established economic nexus thresholds for remote retailers, and amended certain excise taxes. In other words, 2018 brought new headaches to Kentucky businesses statewide. But one group in particular was more burdened than the rest: nonprofit organizations. New legislation forced nonprofits to pay sales tax on all the extended services, if applicable, plus, most notably, on sales of admission. This cut deeply into a nonprofit’s ability to raise funds at fundraising events.

Nonprofits had to employ some creative techniques to separate sponsorships and donations from the costs associated with being allowed entry into their fundraising events. Additionally, sales tax had to be collected and paid on certain items auctioned during these events. If the auction item in question was a physical object, tax had to be paid on it – and at the auctioned price, not the actual, retail value of the item. But auction items such as lawn care services or vacations were exempt from sales tax collection. These are only a few examples of the nightmare nonprofits were forced to navigate. Compliance with sale tax laws drained their resources and significantly impacted the ability of nonprofits statewide to provide their charitable purposes in draining the resources they had available to them.

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By Aaron Smith, Partner
English, Lucas, Priest and Owsley, LLP

Just a few short weeks ago, attorneys Buzz English and J.A. Sowell from our firm took a case to trial because our client felt it was the best option, and we concurred.

In that case, we were defending a truck driver and the company he worked for against a lawsuit filed by a pedestrian he struck at night while driving. Our observation from that case is that sometimes it is best to go to trial — and we had that lesson reinforced for us and our clients again this week in Simpson Circuit Court.

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By Sarah Jarboe, Partner
English, Lucas, Priest and Owsley LLP

lead paintLast month, news outlets reported that HGTV stars Chip and Joanna Gaines’ company would pay a $40,000 fine for violating the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule (“RRP Rule”) on work sites. The fines are a result of an Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) review of the HGTV show, Fixer Upper, which showed workers on their renovation sites violating EPA regulations.

Magnolia Homes, the Gaines’ company, took immediate steps to rectify problems when first contacted by the EPA in 2015, the EPA said in a statement. Beyond the $40,000 fine, Magnolia Homes will spend $160,000 to abate lead paint in homes in Waco, Texas, where the couple and Magnolia Homes are based.

This large expenditure could have been avoided with good legal advice and sound work practices.

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By Leah Morrison, Attorney
English, Lucas, Priest and Owsley, LLP

Leah Morrison

Leah Morrison, attorney

One of the most frequent reasons clients tell me they want to create a will, trust, or other estate documents is to avoid probate. People have come to see probate as an unduly burdensome process that can cost a lot of money and time, but in Kentucky, it’s not as bad as you might fear.

Before we delve into it, let’s take a moment to review what probate is. Probate is the legal process by which the financial affairs of a deceased person are concluded. It is a court supervised process in which assets are accumulated and distributed in accordance with the decedent’s will or pursuant to the statutory plan of descent, and debts are gathered for payment. Although, in Kentucky, the supervision provided by the court is often times very minimal.

While Kentucky’s probate laws are sufficient to ensure the deceased person’s assets are properly managed and distributed to the appropriate person, the requirements of the probate process are minimal enough that most people navigate it smoothly without incident.

The one thing, though, to know is that probate does make your will public. Your will becomes a public document that is recorded in the court system, and is available to anyone who wishes to view it.

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By Nathan Vinson, attorney
English, Lucas, Priest & Owsley, LLP

IRS taxes gambling

The IRS is considering changing the way it taxes gambling payouts.

Since 1977, the IRS has required those who won $1,200 or more from slot machines or $1,500 or more from Keno to report and pay taxes on those winnings. We wrote about this rule earlier this year as it pertains to horse racing, a subject near and dear to Kentucky hearts.

After nearly 40 years of this practice, the IRS is considering changing that limit to $600, and casino gaming operators aren’t pleased.

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